Posts Tagged ‘specs’

HTC Desire vs HTC Desire S – Benchmarks, browser speed test and more [HD]

June 9, 2011

Hi folks, I’m back with another video today comparing my lovely HTC Desire with my shiny new Desire S. This is to complement the little write-up I did a month or so ago. Let me know what you think!

Next video coming up later in the week is the Plants vs Zombies Android review and walk-through!

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LIVE TEST: HTC Desire Mugen Extended Battery 3200mAh Review

April 15, 2011

Mugen Power Battery 3200mAh HTC DesireIt’s the day we’ve all been waiting for. Will the Mugen Power battery make much of a difference when compared to the stock HTC one? Will buying a non-phone-branded battery be the right choice?

As I have previously mentioned I am always very sceptical about non-branded or ‘generic’ batteries which is why I was pleasantly surprised when I was contacted by @MugenBatteries who wanted me to test drive their Desire extended battery. So sure they are of their battery they shipped one over for me to test out and review.

Mugen Extended Battery Back CaseNow the battery is obviously slightly larger than the original battery. It sticks out 5mm from the back of the phone hence it comes with a new back to put on your Desire. This encloses the battery nicely and is the same material as the rest of your Desire – a ‘grippy’ plastic.

After 5 days of patient prepping, the battery is now ready to go through it’s test and I will see how long I can make it last with normal use of my HTC Desire. I have downgraded my Desire from Gingerbread 2.3 back to Froyo 2.2 to make this as fair a test as possible. You may recall in previous tests that I managed to get a full 14 hours out of the battery and still have 34% remaining. Will the 2x+ capacity of the Mugen Power battery really last twice as long?

Let’s find out.

Here’s the setup:

Fully charged at 9am.
Screen: Medium brightness (auto brightness off)
WiFi: ON (Wireless N enabled but will not be used at work as we currently only have 802.11b/g)
Syncing: ON (2 Gmail accounts and FriendStream – see below)
Bluetooth: OFF
GPS: OFF
FriendStream: ON (Twitter updating every 15 minutes and Facebook every 1 hour)
Wallpaper: Live – HTC default
All other settings have been left at the Froyo 2.2 default

To make things easy to compare I will put my previous results in square brackets so you can compare the ‘new’ to ‘old’ battery readings. Remember; the old battery is the stock HTC one.

9:00 – 100% As I put in my Mugen battery into the phone, sweat is pouring off my face. Will it last all day or will I be left stranded by mid-afternoon?

11:00 – 96% [92% in previous test] Already you can see the improvement. I do think however that the ‘initial rundown’ of the battery happens quicker during the first few hours of use so I think we should see it slow down over the rest of the day. The phone has just had general use, the usual music on the way to work, texts and e-mails.

12:00 – 95% [N/A in previous test] Well I’ve only lost a single percent in an hour! Not bad at all! A fair bit of usage too – WordPress and e-mails.

13:00 – 92% [88% in previous test] I’ve been using my phone quite heavily during my lunch hour and have only lost 3% battery which isn’t bad at all. When you compare this to my original battery test running Eclair (I was down to 80% battery at this point) you can already see the benefits of Froyo and the extended battery.

14:00 – 90% [78% in previous test] The battery is still looking pretty healthy. When compared to the stock battery I already have an extra 12% battery left. Go Mugen! Go!

15:00 – 88% [N/A in previous test] Only lost a couple of percent this hour. I must admit I’m getting quite used to the HTC Sense ROM again – I feel like I’m ‘home’. Don’t get me wrong, the Gingerbread ROM I had was nice and speedy but the HTC Sense just feels more ‘solid’.

16:00 – 88% [N/A in previous test] Wow, this isn’t a typo – an hour has passed and I still have 88% remaining in the battery! I’ve used it for a couple of e-mails but nothing else so that might explain it. It’s good that the standby usage is quite low.

17:00 – 86% [60% in previous test] Well this shows it all. I’m up 26% when compared with the original battery. This is looking great and shows you would quite easily survive ‘the day’ without worrying about charging your phone. It’ll be interesting to see the graph of results when I compare the two batteries. I’ll keep updating throughout the night (and more thank likely tomorrow) to keep you updated.

18:00 – 84% [N/A in previous test]

19:00 – 80% [46% in previous test] Well I have nearly 50% more battery with the Mugen in place which is fantastic news. Even though I’ve just done a 20 minute workout with the “Multi Reps” app (which keeps the screen on when in use) you can see I’ve still got plenty of juice left.

20:00 – 79%  [N/A in previous test]

21:00 – 77%  [N/A in previous test] Well, it’s been 12 hours now and my Mugen Extended Battery has only lost 23% of it’s charge. That’s less than a quarter! If my calculations are correct then that means the battery could last up to 48 hours of “constant” use. I say “constant” because obviously the phone has been used during this 12 hour shift. Overnight the phone will not be syncing or being used at all so the drainage should be very little. We’ll see how things are in 12 hours from now… PS – I actually had my GPS (location) active until about an hour ago. Although I hadn’t used Google Maps at all, the GPS may have kicked in from time to time – who knows but it doesn’t seemed to have caused too much of an issue battery-wise.

23:00 – 74% [34% in previous test] OK last update of the night. As you can tell, it’s been a huge success! I’m starting to wonder how long it’ll actually last without a charge. Most the weekend as well? Surely not?!

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DAY 2

14:00 - Nearly 30 hours online!

09:00 – 69% – Well, 24 hours on and I’ve still got nearly three quarters of the battery remaining. Overnight the phone was left on but all features were turned off. All that was active was the cellular network. So it looks like you’ll lose around 5% of the battery life if the phone is not being used for 9 hours or so – not bad at all.

14:00 – 54% Still more than half my battery remaining and the phone has been on and active for nearly 30 hours – not bad going at all!

23:00 – 34% Well after a fairly decent afternoon’s worth of usage I’ve lost 20% of the battery. I did some video recording, photography and also used the GPS a bit so it’s fair game. It looks like I’m going to get a good 48 hours out of this.

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DAY 3

09:00 28% – Well I didn’t think I’d see the battery last this long! Let’s see how far it can get me through Sunday. Bearing in mind Mugen recommend not to run the battery ’til it’s flat I will probably take it out at around 5% remaining.

Mugen Battery Test final 118:08 – 5% – Well it’s time to call it a day (or 3?!). The battery has lasted so well today when I really though it would give in. A day spent texting e-mailing and even listening to music and it lasted until the early evening. If I had been anal I could have carried on with battery but used my battery saving tips to extend it as long as possible but no, I thought I’d give the Mugen battery a well earnt rest in my charging dock.

The only niggle I had with the extended battery over the 3 days was when I had the phone on a desk and tried to use the buttons on the bottom of the phone. As the protruding cover makes the phone slightly raised I found using the buttons a bit more difficult. Because they aren’t capacitive like the Nexus One, the phone would tip when I pressed one of them. I tend the use the phone like this if while I’m at work or eating my breakfast but this really isn’t an issue you should be worried of.

Oh and here’s the main proof that my phone was left unplugged and away from power for so long:

mugen standby time

It goes to show that Mugen really do make damn-good batteries.

So, to sum up whether you should buy one of these or not: if you have an HTC Desire – you’d be stupid not to.


You can buy a Mugen Extended 3400mAh battery for your HTC Desire by clicking here.

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[Update] I thought I’d include my Battery Saving Tips video now you’ve read through this article. It’ll show you how to save even more power when using your phone

 

 

 

HTC Desire Vs HTC Desire S – Specs, Size and Software

March 2, 2011

Here it is, the official DesireFanatics showdown between the mighty HTC Desire and the new boy in town: the HTC Desire S.

Having owned the HTC Desire since it’s launch on the T-Mobile network last February, I must say I’m still happy with my phone. There have been a couple of additions to the Desire range but they didn’t quite have the same impact as the original Desire (possibly the Desire HD being the most talked about out of the two – the other being the Desire Z of course).

So let’s see what HTC have tweaked and improved with a year’s worth of feedback and reflection. The reason I say ‘tweak’ and ‘improve’ is because the Desire in its own right was pretty much perfect in both design and features.

[update 09/06/11) I have just made a video to compliment this story which you can see below. I still recommend reading the rest of the article once you’ve watched the video though ;)]

So let’s get down to business.

Size

For those of you who say size doesn’t matter – it does – at least when phones are involved. Bigger is certainly not better but too small and it’s unusable, the size of the handset is very important.

HTC Desire S Size Comparison

As you can see, the HTC Desire S is slightly smaller than it’s older brother. The only thing you would notice really however is the fact it is thinner than the Desire.

CPU and Memory

HTC Desire:1GHz with 512MB internal memory
HTC Desire S: 1GHz with 1.1GB internal memorye th

The Desire S still ‘only’ has a 1GHz like the Desire. This is disappointing. As we start to see new Android handsets shipping with dual-core CPUs I was hoping for something more from HTC.

The internal  memory has been more than doubled in the revised Desire. This is good news for speed and app space improvements however it isn’t a huge amount. It would have been nice to see maybe 4GB of internal storage – just for future proofing but this would have put up the production costs I suppose. As more and more apps support moving to SD storage it should become less of a problem but I still can’t help feeling a little underwhelmed.

Platform

HTC Desire: Android 2.2 Froyo
HTC Desire S: Android 2.3 Gignerbread

The Desire started its life with Eclair 2.1 but was then updated to Froyo 2.2. This brought with it speed and functionality improvements. We can expect the same improvements from Gingerbread.

Battery

HTC Desire: 1400mAh
HTC Desire S: 1450mAh

What?! Did HTC not see the problems users had with battery life in their Desires? Increasing the battery size by 50mAh is not really going to help. Let’s hope that Gingerbread brings even more improvements to the battery life so the Desire S with it’s increased bells and whistles can last at least a day.

Camera

HTC Desire: 5MP camera with single LED flash
HTC Desire S: 5MP cameria with single LED flash + front facing VGA camera

This is the big physical change on the desire – the inclusion of a front-facing camera. In no way is this new or amazing technology to have on a phone but it is nice to have as an option. I must admit, none of the phones I have had with a front-facing camera have had any use out of it but that might just be me. In a increasingly “FaceTime” (I hate that word) world, people start to expect these kinds of things. Skype will soon support video calls (if it doesn’t already) so it’ll be useful for many users. Still only a 5MP camera on the Desire S I would have thought HTC may have opted for 8MP at least.

Design

The second physical change in the handset is the new unibody design of the Desire S. This makes it a lot stronger and lighter (by 5 grams) than the Desire. HTC have also removed the physical buttons from the Desire S. This is something I was unsure about until today when I had the pleasure of using an HTC Wildfire. The touch-screen buttons worked well and the feedback received when pressing a button was sufficient enough for my liking. There is an interesting omission of the optical trackball. I often use this to move the text cursor around when correcting spelling errors so let’s hope Gingerbread introduces an easy and precise method of navigating through text.

Final thoughts

If I didn’t have a Desire I would get the Desire S in a heartbeat. Sadly I do have a Desire and I also have 12 months left on my contract. I admire HTC for improving the near-perfect Desire but it’s not enough to make me want to spend £400 on a new toy. I’m quite happy to spend another 12 months with my Desire however, I haven’t gotten bored of it yet like I have done with other phones. I think in the ever evolving world of apps and software updates it keeps consumers occupied for longer and thus the product’s lifespan also increases.

If you don’t have a Desire then go for the Desire S. If you do, I’d hold out until the Desire HD 2 comes out and we’ll see what that’s like 😉

HTC Desire S coming in April for O2 customers

March 1, 2011

O2 have added a “coming soon” page for the newly announced HTC Desire S.

Said to be arriving in April, are there enough ‘key features’ to get you tempted?

Key Features

  • Sense 2.1 with cloud support and Gingerbread OS
  • Front facing camera
  • Capture & Share in HD with a 720p camera
  • Record video at 30 frames per second
  • Aluminum uni-body design

Tomorrow I’ll do a little comparison between the HTC Desire and the Desire S so you can help make a better decision. My initial guess is no, there won’t be a need to update – not yet anyway.

HTC Desire HD Review – 9/10

October 27, 2010

HTC Desire HDPocket-Lint.com have posted a lovely review for the lovely HTC Desire HD. Will you be upgrading your ‘old’ Desire and making way for its bigger brother? Personally I’m going to stick with my non-HD Desire as it is just about the right size for me. Any bigger, as the HD obviously is, and I wouldn’t be able to fit it in some of the jeans I wear.

Be sure to check out Pocket-Lint’s review and let me know what you think. Is it worth the upgrade to get the 8MP camera with 720p recording? Do you really need SRS sound on your phone? Are your hands big enough?

Here are a few snippets from the review:

The build quality is exemplary; the luscious metal body nestles comfortably in a large hand, the soft curves of the edges providing enough grip without introducing any hard lines. It’s more comfortable to hold than the iPhone 4 and more comfortable to make calls with thanks to softer top line, but the size – 123 x 68 x 11.8mm – will make it difficult to use for those with smaller hands.

Of course, the source of your content to share may well be the video camera on the back. Bumping up the megapixels to 8 (and having a noticeably larger physical lens than the 5-megapixel HD7), you also get video capture at 720p HD at 30fps. In daylight the results are very good too, with a solid frame rate and an acceptable level of detail. The video capture also offers in-video focusing, which is a bit of a rare feature. Some phones will offer continuous autofocus, but in the case of the Desire HD, you can touch the screen to refocus on a particular point. There is a delay and it hunts a little before hitting to focal point, so it will never give you slick focus pulls, but to re-centre on the action it will see you right.

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A detailed HTC Desire review from UK T3 Magazine

March 31, 2010

T3 have published a more detailed review of the HTC Desire on their site. They have acknowledged that the Desire is an iPhone-beater (not killer because you can’t kill a phone that’s already sold millions can you?).

Here are a few snippets:

Right now, let’s put aside that dumb phrase “iPhone killer”. The fact that a phone is better than Apple’s all-conquering, landscape-changing, gadget-genre-inventing device doesn’t “kill” it, any more than Chelsea defeating Man United means that that particular football team is dispatched to the Araldite Glue League (Northern Area). But make no mistake: this phone is better than the iPhone.

As we mentioned, the Desire is one of the most powerful Android phones on offer, and it shows when you pick it up for the first time. It reacts to your slightest touch, slipping between home screens without a hint of slowdown, and allowing you to open multiple applications without destroying the user experience.

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(more…)

*25 minute* HTC Desire unboxing video!!

March 27, 2010

OK so the whole video doesn’t involve someone taking 25 minutes to open a box but it is nonetheless a new unboxing video for the HTC Desire.

The video also goes on to give the Desire a once over in detail so, if you found yourself without a T-Mobile Desire this morning then you can at least make yourself feel a bit worse by watching this video:

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HD HTC Desire overview video from T-Mobile winner

March 24, 2010

The lucky b*stard man who won an HTC Desire through T-Mobile has uploaded his video to YouTube.

The video upload was one of the requirements the winner of T-Mobile’s competition had to do – You’ll find it down below.

I’m not bitter at all but I now hate T-Mobile forever for not letting me win.

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HTC Desire pre-order cheapest price update: now £368.77!

March 22, 2010

On my daily scour of the Interweb for the cheapest HTC Desire price I’ve come across the cheapest so far – £368.77!

It’s from Kikatek.com and if you pre-order the phone using your Visa Debit card you get the phone for £368.77. If you use any other card you’ll have to pay £370.62 (for some reason) which is still £17 cheaper than the previous cheapest price.

You’ll have to register your interest to be notified when the phone is in stock but it’s worth a shot.

I’ve never personally heard of Kikatek.com but their Google Shop rating is nearly 5/5.

Here is a direct link to the phone on their site

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The new and amazing *BLACK* HTC Desire “prototype”

March 22, 2010

The Internet has been full of posts about this new “prototype” HTC Desire that comes in a sleek, sexy black colour.

Granted it looks nice but isn’t “prototype” too strong a word? I think it is. You wouldn’t have called a Nokia 3310 with a red casing on a prototype would you? Well if you would then you’re stupid.

As sleek as the black prototype version of the phone looks, I can’t help but to still be in love with the original silver version.

If you want to see a black HTC Desire in action then check out the video below:

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